Contemporaneous Extension


This week is HOT.

Several solid things going on this week. If I had an intern, this would be homework.

— Wednesday, April 23 at 6:30pm: Capricious 88 (88 Eldridge, LES) hosts a conversation “posing questions on feminine identity within the context of modern technology and feminist art practice.” Artists include Petra Collins (catch her solo show before it closes April 27), Caitlin Keogh, Martín Gutierrez and other special guests, moderated by Paige K. Bradley. More pointedly: “The talk will also explore whether the possibility exists for an intrinsically feminine contemporary practice, both connecting and departing from traditions of “women’s work” and feminine modes of craft.” RSVP only event (reach out to gallery@becapricious.com with your name and ‘Artist Talk RSVP’ in the subject line).

— Wednesday, April 23 at 6pm: Josh Decter at NYPL, in conversation with John Miller, Chelsea Haines, Paul Ramirez Jonas, Ruba Katrib. The conversation with revolve around his recent publication, Art is a Problem. The book explores over 30 years of writing and criticism, curatorial proposals, and the like. It looks at art as both a potential outlet for resolving problems (spatial tangents, political catalyst) and remaining a significant danger to itself. More information can be found on the NYPL Art Book Series website.

— Tuesday, April 22 at 7pm: The Strand will host Richard Serra, who will be signing copies of a new publication entitled Richard Serra: Early Work. Early Work explores work from 1966-72 when he was playing around in New York, beginning with rubber and neon prior to the massive steel works we know him for. Although this event requires one purchase the volume, I can’t imagine it wouldn’t be worth it. You will also be getting archival texts and photographs, AND some delicious new scholarship from Hal Foster and David Fraenkel. Joy!



Brooklyn Zine Fest

PSYCHED FOR THIS:

Some goodies

Saturday, April 26:
Put A Egg On It
Bushwick Review
Pillow Talk Zine
Apropos
Vice Versa Press

Sunday, April 27:
Desert Island
Smoke Signal
Barnard Zine Library
Gut Feelings Zine
Booklyn
Hydrochloric



Time Stamp

Some recent reading, to share and to archive. The market, with all of its peaks, perpetrators, and imitators, uncovers inescapable contradictions between art practice and art as profession.

 Review of Contemporary Fiction: Spring 2011, special issue: failure. With stars going to “Fantasias Impromptu” (Joshua Cohen), “The Failing of Americans” (Dan Visel), “Itchy Homo, or Why I Am So Terrible” (Travis Jeppesen).

- “Thinking about Art Practice and the Role of Compromise,” via Hyperallergic, March 19, 2014.

- “Limits on Ivory Sales, Meant to Protect Elephants, Set Off Wide Concerns,” via NY Times, March 20, 2014

- “David Foster Wallace Predicted Our Selfie Anxiety Back in 1996,” via The Wire, April 8, 2014

- “Letter to a Young Artist #1,” via Penny Arcade, April 8, 2014

- “The Sacred Cows of the Art World (Or, Why Everyone’s So Nervous About Stefan Simchowitz),” via Artspace, April 2, 2014

- “Why I Hate Post-Internet Art,” via CultureTwo/Brian Droitcour, March 31, 2014

- “On Art and Investment,” via Art-Agenda, March 25, 2014

 

Writing to come.

Romulo Celdran, Macro XIII, 2013. Polychromed foamboard, aluminium, and epoxy resin; 200 x 120 x 196 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Romulo Celdran, Macro XIII, 2013. Polychromed foamboard, aluminium, and epoxy resin; 200 x 120 x 196 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Romulo Celdran, Zoom XXVII, 2012. White pencil and acrylic on board; 108 x 76.5 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Romulo Celdran, Zoom XXVII, 2012. White pencil and acrylic on board; 108 x 76.5 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Romulo Celdran is showing at Hasted Kraeutler through April 19th.



Aldo Tambellini in OSMOS

I recently published an article considering Aldo Tambellini’s Videogram series in OSMOS Magazine. The magazine, published by Cay Sophie Rabinowitz (formerly of Parkett and Fantom), considers photography in all its glory, from reportage and artists’ projects to commentary on non-artistic image production and mutations in the medium. Although online presence is scarce, you can purchase the forthcoming issue via Artbook here. It is surely worth it, with incredible full-page spreads and contemporary critical thought on the future of photography. Here’s a small excerpt:

“The rubble and grime of downtown Manhattan was talismanic. Tambellini discovered discarded projector slides one day and continued his drawing practice onto their surface—they were sliced, melted, manipulated chemically with acid, paint, and ink. These slides, as well as 16mm film altered with similar improvisation and technique, became the basis of his Electromedia performances. Several projection surfaces hosted particular arrangements of slides in rapid secession. Poetry, choreography, and recorded sound were furthermore included in the cerebral onslaught. The electrified universe mirrored the violence in Lucca, Italy, Tambellini had experienced during World War II—emotionally distressing yet an undeniable catalyst for growth as a human being. The projected components of these performances, more aggressive than ambient, are referred to as the Black Film Series. They are somewhere between political rant, psychedelic introspection, and tantric inquiry blasted from the speakers of a planetarium. When it came to technology, excitement and suspicion existed in a symbiotic relationship for Tambellini. He utilized his films, still an unrestrained medium, to dissect its subtext and thus physical capability.”

For more information, check out Aldo’s website (with original poetry, film, and 2D works) or his gallery, James Cohan Gallery.

Aldo Tambellini, Videogram, 1968. Videogram on photographic paper, 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 in.(40 x 50.2 cm). Image courtesy of James Cohan Gallery, New York.

Aldo Tambellini, Videogram, 1968. Videogram on photographic paper, 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 in.(40 x 50.2 cm). Image courtesy of James Cohan Gallery, New York.



“Data”
March 1, 2014, 11:37 pm
Filed under: Hot off the presses, Treatz | Tags: , , , , , ,

 

Now read this.



Mars at Sunrise
March 1, 2014, 4:20 pm
Filed under: Treatz | Tags: , , ,



The Most Distressing Time of the Year
February 3, 2014, 10:00 am
Filed under: Events, Treatz | Tags: , , , , , ,

Dear IRS:

Please refrain from extracting every ounce of happiness I have this spring with your demanding deduction criteria and complicated formal wording. I’ll be expecting my check in the mail. Step on it.

Warmly,

Lynn

Alfred Eisenstaedt‘s series of taxpayers from 1944 will persevere me onward and upward. Income Tax is 101 years old today! Images are courtesy of LIFE Magazine, and the entire series can be found here.




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