Contemporaneous Extension


Pastor Paul
July 14, 2014, 12:00 pm
Filed under: Treatz | Tags: , , , , , ,

Considering my love for all things extraterrestrial or unflinchingly spiritual, I wanted to share this super fly project written by and starring Jules David Bartkowski, shot in Ghana by the talented Adam Abada. Below you’ll find the trailer for the film, scheduled to premiere in December 2014.

From the project’s successful Kickstarter campaign:
PASTOR PAUL is a feature film that follows Benjamin, a white American tourist, as he unexpectedly becomes famous for (and possessed by) his title role as the ghost of an evangelical preacher in a popular new Nollywood movie.

Our film aims to conjure up and distort colonialist narratives of Hollywood films set in Africa. The vicissitudes of fame change Benjamin’s role in this location from an awkward and irrelevant tourist to the vessel for the spirit of a colonial missionary. The humor and pathos of this affliction will be drawn distinctively in order to embody and disembody the imagery we have of the white preacher in Africa. We want to explore themes of perception, performance, and the experience of cultural gazes moving in both directions. We watch Ben watching Africa until we watch Ben watching Africa watch him back.”

 

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Cinematic Photography or Photographic Film?

Despite being somewhat stagnant on the freelance writing front for the last month (I blame moving out of my Brooklyn apartment, a lack of inspiration, and a general desire to be anywhere but New York in the dog-days), I have a recent piece that went up on Whitehot Magazine that I am incredibly proud of. I was introduced to Vanessa Albury, a daring new media artist working in the mediums of 16/35mm film and photography of all breeds, at Peter Clough’s One and Three Quarters of an Inch show at St. Cecilia’s last year (it was brilliant!). Her piece was an exotic thrill, an incredibly overwhelming display of tropical foliage that wrapped up the central, spiral staircase in the convent. Poignant scents ascended the stairwell and several lights illuminated the lush vegetation for dramatic emphasis. The piece was inspired by her grandfather’s Miami greenhouse and maintains Albury’s emphasis on triggering collective and public memory, milking and challenging time, and astutely hypnotizing the viewer. The profile recently published analyzes her oeuvre of photographic and cinematic work spanning approximately ten years and links it to new, even unfinished, works.

Below is a small passage, but check out the full review here.

Photography has been regarded as an indicator of passing time and death since the turn of the 20th century. Theoretically, the snapshot was an inexplicable moment: impossible to recreate and a betrayal to the truth of the moment in its lack of breath, of movement. ‘Funeral (Projection)’ (2005-08) cleverly mocks photography’s mythological magnitude. The piece was realized at Albury’s grandmother’s funeral in 2004. The wide-angle, 35mm shot of a cleared out funeral hall situates the deceased, resting in her coffin, at the center of the image. A chandelier and several table lamps within the frame beam triumphantly, almost on the verge of bursting from augmented amplification at the time of death. A subterranean perspective bellies vulnerability. The photograph is presented as an installation: it occupies an entire wall as the hum of a projector contributes a drone to the collective viewing experience. The viewer slips into reverie amid the murmur of machinery and the weight of the relentless moment. Albury asserts this photograph as an uninterrupted, persistent memorial. It is an emotional scene identifiable to the subconscious of the viewer. Albury provides ‘Funeral (Memory)’ (2005-08) as a keepsake reflecting upon the installation. The highly pixelated Xerox copy of the projection challenges the subject’s timelessness in memory. The Xerox is a synopsis, degrading the poignant image into a muddled scene of black and white diamonds. Photography parallels memory in this case, reflecting the instability of emotional documentation and the nuances of time. Repetition, as was the case in learning cursive or multiplication tables, can solidify memory while numbing one to the particulars of the present. “

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Memory),' 2005-08, Xerox copy

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Memory),' 2005-08, Xerox copy

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Projection),' 2005-2008, 35mm projection

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Projection),' 2005-2008, 35mm projection



Get Excited!!(#)!

With the holiday season rapidly approaching, I am finding my reindeer spirit-animal in good cheer. Furthermore, there are also a few things I’m particularly amped about approaching…

SANTACON: If you live in NYC/Tri-State area, you should treat yourself to a whiskey and hot chocolate at 10am and come to SantaCon. The revelry lasts all day, and usually results in belligerence but not without seeing hundreds upon hundreds of people dressed in Santa suits caroling, dancing, and generally sharing unspeakable holiday merriment.

 

'Untitled,' Benjamin Norman, 2009

'Untitled,' Benjamin Norman, 2009

'Untitled,' Benjamin Norman, 2009

'Untitled,' Benjamin Norman, 2009

 

 

 

Performance 9 at MoMA: I’m planning on heading over to see Allora & Calzadilla’s performance of Beethoven’s Fourth Movement from the Ninth Symphony (‘Ode to Joy’) next week. The performers formulate the piece backwards and upside-down from inside the actual piano while traipsing around the second floor atrium. With two full octaves depleted from the range of the piano itself due to the massive hole, it should be a thrill to rehash the glorious work. It will be performed through January 11, every hour from 11:30 til close.

 

'Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on “Ode to Joy”? for a Prepared Piano.' 2008. Prepared Bechstein piano, pianist (Amir Khosrowpour shown).

'Stop, Repair, Prepare: Variations on “Ode to Joy”? for a Prepared Piano.' 2008. Prepared Bechstein piano, pianist (Amir Khosrowpour shown).

 

 

 

Fire in My Belly (1986-7): After all the press for being pulled from the ‘Hide/Seek’ exhibition in Washington, D.C., the New Museum has stepped up and is showing the full 13-minute version of David Wojnarowicz’s striking film commenting on life, death, and the mortality that was the AIDS epidemic. The full version, as well as the 4-minute excerpt that appeared in the D.C show, will be on view through January 23rd.  The New Museum has coined it as “an act of solidarity with the many artists whose rights of expression continue to be limited by misinformation and fear.” KUDOS to the Museum, I can’t wait to check it out and laugh at how biased and judgmental Catholic conservatives can be.

 

David Wojnarowicz, 'Fire in my Belly,' 1986-7, video.

David Wojnarowicz, 'Fire in my Belly,' 1986-7, video.

For those who can’t make it to the New Museum:

(Courtesy of P.P.O.W Gallery)

 

 

 

DCKT Contemporary: The wonderfully curated gallery is moving from their spot on the Bowery to 237 Eldridge Street and having their inaugural exhibit sparked by a spiritual parade led by artist Irvin Morazan. His solo show, Temple of the Bearded Man, opens January 8th. The parade, entitled the Coyote Procession, takes place January 7 at 6pm and is accompanied by a Mexican mariachi band, mythological headdresses, and what looks to be quite the absurdist showing. Get ready to transition your charcoal soul into the New Year!

 

Irvin Morazon, 'Coyote Procession,' 2011, mixed media

Irvin Morazan, 'Coyote Procession,' 2011, mixed media

 

 

Art Barter: Taking place this week at 131 Chrystie Street, its the ultimate trade-off to win yourself a piece of art! Happening through the 12th of December, take the best of what you got and see if an artist is willing to take you up on your offer and give you a piece of their own. Everything from woolen socks to a weekend at homes in Antwerp and Chile have been offered. Optimally jugs of homemade eggnog or an offer to pose for photographs can get me something good!

 

 

Andy Warhol- Motion Pictures: Starting up at MoMA on December 19th and showing through March 21st, I can’t think of many other excuses to go to the museum on a freezing day that is surely in our future. It explores his famed silent films like Blow Job and Kiss among many others. I recently saw I Shot Andy Warhol, a great film about his fascination with stardom and the rhythms we maintain as individuals which is sure to be expanded upon in this show.

 

Andy Warhol, 'Screen Test: Allen Ginsberg (1966).' 16mm film (black and white, silent). 4 min. at 16fps. 2010

Andy Warhol, 'Screen Test: Allen Ginsberg (1966).' 16mm film (black and white, silent). 4 min. at 16fps. 2010