Contemporaneous Extension


Aldo Tambellini in OSMOS

I recently published an article considering Aldo Tambellini’s Videogram series in OSMOS Magazine. The magazine, published by Cay Sophie Rabinowitz (formerly of Parkett and Fantom), considers photography in all its glory, from reportage and artists’ projects to commentary on non-artistic image production and mutations in the medium. Although online presence is scarce, you can purchase the forthcoming issue via Artbook here. It is surely worth it, with incredible full-page spreads and contemporary critical thought on the future of photography. Here’s a small excerpt:

“The rubble and grime of downtown Manhattan was talismanic. Tambellini discovered discarded projector slides one day and continued his drawing practice onto their surface—they were sliced, melted, manipulated chemically with acid, paint, and ink. These slides, as well as 16mm film altered with similar improvisation and technique, became the basis of his Electromedia performances. Several projection surfaces hosted particular arrangements of slides in rapid secession. Poetry, choreography, and recorded sound were furthermore included in the cerebral onslaught. The electrified universe mirrored the violence in Lucca, Italy, Tambellini had experienced during World War II—emotionally distressing yet an undeniable catalyst for growth as a human being. The projected components of these performances, more aggressive than ambient, are referred to as the Black Film Series. They are somewhere between political rant, psychedelic introspection, and tantric inquiry blasted from the speakers of a planetarium. When it came to technology, excitement and suspicion existed in a symbiotic relationship for Tambellini. He utilized his films, still an unrestrained medium, to dissect its subtext and thus physical capability.”

For more information, check out Aldo’s website (with original poetry, film, and 2D works) or his gallery, James Cohan Gallery.

Aldo Tambellini, Videogram, 1968. Videogram on photographic paper, 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 in.(40 x 50.2 cm). Image courtesy of James Cohan Gallery, New York.

Aldo Tambellini, Videogram, 1968. Videogram on photographic paper, 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 in.(40 x 50.2 cm). Image courtesy of James Cohan Gallery, New York.

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