Contemporaneous Extension


Into the Wild Technicolor Yonder

Greetings, readers! It is hard to believe I haven’t written in almost three months, but things have been chaotic in the best, busiest way. I have successfully moved into a new apartment with my delightful significant other, and am expanding my writing into new outlets. I am contributing to a spectacular arts journalism blog founded by CUE Art Foundation called ON-VERGE. I have been chosen as the Contributor at Large for 2012-2013 and am ecstatic to be working with Jill Conner and Megan Garwood. I will be contributing regular features and show recommendations for the site, so check it out for my latest! I am going to dedicate more of my leftover material and exuding opinions to this space, allowing it to be a supplement to the material I present to ON-VERGE.

So thus, my first feature to share! Last week I interviewed Sarah Kurz, an absolutely lovely figurative painter with a show up at Allegra LaViola Gallery in Chinatown as we speak through March 11. Please check out the full interview here, let me know what you think! Here’s a small excerpt:

“The desire to reinvent the figure has become a point of contention, demanding more than the gestural theatrics of Parmigianino or blatant authority of Velazquez. Sarah Kurz rehashes the versatility of figurative painting by provoking a psychological intimacy with her audience and a physical solidarity with her medium. I spoke with her prior to her first solo exhibition at Allegra LaViola gallery in Chinatown about the work in the show, her guiding lights, and the comedy of sex.

LM Let’s talk about your upcoming show, “Made for Love”. Why is everything so small?

SK I am thinking about human size, interaction, and intimacy. I want the viewer to relate to the image. I am interested in cropping an existing image to only show what needs to be shown. You know, ‘less is more’. I edit inconsequential information and only keep what is absolutely necessary. It’s about conveying as much as possible through as little information as possible. Asking what really needs to be in this image to convey what I want to convey. It’s a reductive approach. I had a critique with Eugenie Tsai and she said the teapot painting [Never in the Morning, 2009] was like the cover of a romance novel. She said she could feel the whole novel through that image. The teapot painting is a new take on a still life, it captures a moment mid-action, it’s an active still life.”

Sarah Kurz, 'Tried and True,' 2012, oil on linen, 7" x 12"

Sarah Kurz, 'Tried and True,' 2012, oil on linen, 7" x 12"

Sarah Kurz, 'Mon Amour, Mon Ami (Le Bonheur),' 2012, oil on linen, 54" x 30"

Sarah Kurz, 'Mon Amour, Mon Ami (Le Bonheur),' 2012, oil on linen, 54" x 30"

Sarah Kurz, 'Lovely to See You,' 2012, oil on linen, 30" x 20"

Sarah Kurz, 'Lovely to See You,' 2012, oil on linen, 30" x 20"

((Coming up on ON-VERGE: An ode to ‘On Photography’ (Susan Sontag) via the current programming at ICP.))

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