Contemporaneous Extension


Do You See What I See?

Had a write-up posted on Hyperallergic today on Jason McCoy Gallery’s most recent show, 70 Years of Abstraction: Excerpts. The show displayed an abundance of work of debatable vigor. I thought there was a great conversation among works in the second room, focusing more on particular motifs in abstraction rather than just an overview of significant names. My personal favorites were the ones that consumed the viewer, yet truly gave them no option but to travel into their subconscious in the midst of artistic intentions or imagery. Abstraction heightens awareness of your retina’s preferences and can even evoke a physical reaction. I also like the ‘flash-back’ potential of abstract images. With less of a direct correlation to the visual world, the atmosphere and feeling surrounding the image encourages a cerebral slideshow. I also did want to give a shout-out to Sarah Mattes, who I couldn’t fit into the review but is doing some really exciting things with abstraction. Her abysmal mixed-media abstraction in the show consists of a handful of navy-blue materials layered within the frame. The monochrome interacts with the viewer, tempting them into the seemingly dangerous space of sharp angles and persistent corners. Mattes’s labor-intensive abstraction unveils an enthusiasm for new processes and methods of production in the modern age, and the triumphs still to be had over an ancient practice. This one’s for all the haters!

Here’s an excerpt of the article:

“An edition of Josef Albers’s Homage to the Square series is prominently displayed. The room also boasts an extremely underwhelming oil painting from Jackson Pollock before he was famous, ”Constellation” (1946) from the Accabonac Creek series.

A few lesser known forbearers of New York abstraction like Hedda Sterne and Charles Pollock keep each other company. The techniques are varied yet somewhat traditional and predictable. It was clear from this room that abstract art, as Rudolf Amheim wrote in his Toward a Psychology of Art, ‘tends to conceal the philosophical, religious, and social meaning of the individual’s life, to destroy the artist’s function in the community, and to reduce the task to a merely ‘aesthetic’ one.'”

FULL ARTICLE HERE.

Sarah Mattes, 'M mother,' 2011. plastic, wood, foam board, cardboard, paper, acrylic paint. 16 5/8 x 13 x 1 3/4"

Sarah Mattes, 'M mother,' 2011. plastic, wood, foam board, cardboard, paper, acrylic paint. 16 5/8 x 13 x 1 3/4"

Room 2, Wall 1, Jason McCoy Gallery

Room 2, Wall 1, Jason McCoy Gallery

Wall 2, Room 2, James McCoy Gallery

Wall 2, Room 2, Jason McCoy Gallery

Paul Pagk, 'OGLS 127,' 2010, Oil on linen, 25 x 24 inches

Paul Pagk, 'OGLS 127,' 2010, Oil on linen, 25 x 24 inches

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