Contemporaneous Extension


Anticipatory Post

Several amazing shows that I think deserve some attention:

Kadar Brock’s Unclaimed Space at Thierry Goldberg Projects:  Caught up with Kadar last week to check out the new pieces in this show, which I am absolutely in love with. He’ll be showing several large canvases, deconstructed and stripped earlier works that he sequentially scrapes away. They take on a surreal middle ground between artist’s process and complete destruction. I was enlightened by his talk of magical spells and rituals as the basis of his process, which is heavily weighted in gesture and mark-making. Just opened yesterday, and is up through December 23.

Fred Tomaselli at the Brooklyn Museum: I have been thinking a lot about resin, both its characteristics and its place in contemporary art production, and think Tomaselli would be a great reference point and inspiration for what the medium can do. The show is open through January 2.

 

Fred Tomaselli, 'Untitled (Expulsion),' 2000. Leaves, pills, insects, acrylic, photocollage, and resin on wood panel. 84 x 120 in

Fred Tomaselli, 'Untitled (Expulsion),' 2000. Leaves, pills, insects, acrylic, photocollage, and resin on wood panel. 84 x 120 in

Going International at FLAG Art Foundation:  Nothing like a group show of stellar international artists. However, in looking into it, I realize a good handful of artists (and pieces, even) are drawn from NYC museum bangers  (Ortega’s piece that is the figurehead of the show was in a P.S. 1’s That was Then…This is Now from 2008; Meckseper’s video mentioned in the PR was in the Whitney Biennial this year). Most importantly, I am looking forward to checking out Nigel Cooke’s inclusion considering I still kick myself for not getting to his solo show at Andrea Rosen last year. Definitely worth checking out, its up through January 29.

 

Nigel Cooke, 'Heavy Beret,' 2009, oil on linen

Nigel Cooke, 'Heavy Beret,' 2009, oil on linen

Ana Mendieta at Galerie LeLong: Love Ana. I think her performance work rivals Marina although she seems to be much less well-known. The show is focusing on the documentation of her work, a large majority of which takes place in the wilderness. I’m looking forward to her drawings and sculpture, of which I’m less familiar but further enthused.Its open through December 11.

 

Ana Mendieta, 'Nañigo Burial,' 1976, Lifetime black and white photograph, 8 x 10 inches

Ana Mendieta, 'Nañigo Burial,' 1976, Lifetime black and white photograph, 8 x 10 inches

Kim Dorland: New Material at Mike Weiss: I only found Dorland at Freight + Volume in 2009 and was sucked into his fantastical, salivating, strong work. His solo show at Mike Weiss seems like a bit of a departure in that he focuses on single subjects for the most part but still utilizes forceful relief, mixed media, and an emphasis on the nightmarish wood travails of his childhood in Canada. Open through January 8.

 

Sew Draw at Pandemic Gallery: Features drawings by Richie Lasansky and objects by Allison Read Smith. Lasansky is someone I’m extremely intrigued by, seeing as he works through every step of the printing process from drawing his images, to producing his own ink, and eventually working with the plate to produce each edition. He also studied medicine at Brandeis but then went in the completely opposite direction, so we already have quite a bit in common. Smith is concerned with intangibility through objects, questioning what one finds meaningful and necessary in daily life. I like the fancy-free, the wonderous quality of her work as well. Its open through December 10.

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Richie Lasansky, ‘Bug Fly’ Intaglio print on copper (Engraving), 40” x 24”
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Allison Read Smith, ‘Tortoise and the Hare,’ Mixed Media
Rita Ackermann and Harmony Korine at Swiss Institute: I like how the press release fuses these two figures by their “shared interest in unorthodox and mischievous beauty.” Korine is obviously insane (Gummo freaked me out for weeks, I’m still eager to see Trash Humpers), and the collabo with Ackermann will prove to be one of multi-hashed surfaces and impulsive backwash. Let’s hope i don’t puke!Open through January 22.
Rita Ackermann/Harmony Korine, 'It's Showtime Cloaks,' 2010, mixed media

Rita Ackermann/Harmony Korine, 'It's Showtime Cloaks,' 2010, mixed media

Albert Watson at Hasted Kraeutler: There’s something so painfully beautiful about Watson’s photos, like he’s saving us from the ugly truth he suspects of his subjects. From Kate Moss to Alfred Hitchcock, fashion to still lives, his work emphasizes figure, the exterior containment of the gems of a given interior. I also like his tendency to play with the viewpoints of the human form, utilizing mirrors, single limbs, and even monkeys to dance around our mortality. Open through December 4.
Albert Watson, 'Charlotte in Prada Blouse, Milan, Italy,' 1989, Platinum print, 30 x 22", edition of 3

Albert Watson, 'Charlotte in Prada Blouse, Milan, Italy,' 1989, Platinum print, 30 x 22", edition of 3

Albert Watson, 'Road to Nowhere, Las Vegas,' 2001, C-Print, 70 x 112", edition of 5

Albert Watson, 'Road to Nowhere, Las Vegas,' 2001, C-Print, 70 x 112", edition of 5

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