Contemporaneous Extension


Paprika
August 27, 2013, 1:12 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , ,

By far one of the most disturbing yet hypnotizing animated films I’ve ever seen. The subject of conflating dreams and reality will be on my mind for a while. Waking Life is next on my list. Any other mind-blowing suggestions are welcome!



Vital Information for Your Everyday Life
August 13, 2013, 2:57 pm
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The truth lives!



“We Are All Living Installations”

It isn’t even May and Brooklyn has transcended the 80 degree mark on the Fahrenheit scale. In feeling so jovial, I wanted to return to my homebase and share the excitement! The evacuation of the art community upon first mention of humidity allows for investigations of artist’s studios and a tizzy of group shows. Emergent artists and artists visiting from abroad blossom in the summertime, and the energy is unfathomable. The first stroke of genius of the season can be found at Michael Alan‘s installation occurring this weekend at Dumbo Arts Center. Alan was recently granted an award from the Brooklyn Arts Council that allowed for the rebirth of his Living Installations: an experiment in performance, artistic production, and the union of audio and visual. The production on April 21st is called We Are All Living Installations and will be curated by the ever-clever Emily Colucci, who has followed Alan’s performances closely for several years. This work will integrate a soundtrack, part of Alan’s Sound Drawing project, made over the course of the last several months featuring artists such as Japanther, Geneva Jacuzzi, Noah Becker, Kenny Scharf, and many others. The installations are loosely guided by Alan’s paintings, which are at once intense, lyrical, delicate, and incredibly aggressive. The show is like resetting and engaging your retina like you’ve never done, tasting an image in a spaghetti bowl of narrative obscurity. Tickets for the show can be purchased online through Alan’s website here.

Installation shot from 'Dinner Party for Two,' featuring David Modello and Kim De'ville, 2012. Photo by Joseph Meloy Meloy, courtesy of Michael Alan

Installation shot from 'Dinner Party for Two,' featuring David Modello and Kim De'ville, 2012. Photo by Joseph Meloy Meloy, courtesy of Michael Alan

I recently had a conversation with Michael and have posted the interview on .CRUDO, a bilingual (Spanish/English) platform for commentary on music, art, film, and video. The interview can be found here for your pleasure! Here’s a short snippet:

“LM: You started with the Draw-a-thon and moved into Living Installations, both of which engage the community while developing your own process and stressing your practice to mutate it. What might be your next move in the live sphere?

MA: The Living President Project where I dress up like the president and do dance moves on TV, pointing at weather patterns and what to buy next with girls in bikinis in the back dancing, drinking Lamborghinis. Sign up now and you can get a free scarf! Don’t you just love global warming?

LM: I read a bit about your early performances, which discuss you performing in a Freddy Kruger outfit and doing remixes to “Ice Ice Baby”. What direction is your current music going in, considering the slew of new collaborations?

MA: Well, luckily, I’m not dressed up like Freddy Kruger anymore. I definitely exert myself and push and turn myself inside out during the show with different material. I can joke and act out the music and scenes with the talented models (those freaks love it).”

Michael Alan, Pardon Thee Intrusion, mixed media on paper, 2012.

Michael Alan, Pardon Thee Intrusion, mixed media on paper, 2012. Image courtesy of artist.

Michael Alan, She is My God, 2012, everything on paper, 9" x 11". Image courtesy of the artist.

Michael Alan, She is My God, 2012, everything on paper, 9" x 11". Image courtesy of the artist.



“With age come the inner, the higher life. Who would be forever young, to dwell always in externals?”
April 4, 2012, 2:41 am
Filed under: Uncategorized
Lou Ros, "selfportrait 8," 2010, acrylic on canvas, 17.7 x 13.8 in (image courtesy of Saatchi Online)

Lou Ros, "selfportrait 8," 2010, acrylic on canvas, 17.7 x 13.8 in (image courtesy of Saatchi Online)

Today is my birthday, and I am feeling overcome with gratitude for the opportunities I’ve had in the last year. This blog has been an incredible starting point for my writing and has pushed me to stay with it when I haven’t been as busy as I’ve liked. That being said, I have recently started writing for several publications you should check into!

As Contributor at Large for ON-VERGE, you can find me posting suggestions and features quite regularly. White Zinfandel and Jim Jarmusch’s Coffee and Cigarettes are two recent subjects of my extended ramblings. I am musing a potential feature on Stanley Whitney’s mindbending exhibition at TEAM, and looking to get some more news commentary on the site as well.

MilkMade is another outlet I’ve been putting my efforts wholeheartedly into in the last month or so. Milk Studios is a treasure trove of incredible photographers, evocative fashion, and some of the most enjoyable characters I’ve had the pleasure of knowing. The Milk Gallery is home to a constantly evolving series of photographers, ranging from Cliff Watts to Kevin Erskine. The Milk Underground exhibition of emergent photographers, which finds its way to the gallery several times per year, illustrates how committed the Studio is to fostering talent and providing the space within which they can be discovered.

Furthermore, I am still churning out work with Whitehot Magazine and Whitewall, as well. You can find my Armory Week coverage for Whitewall at the left. Keep your eyes peeled for upcoming reviews in Whitehot on the Brucennial currently in SoHo and Agathe Snow’s exhibition with Eli Hansen at Maccarone.

On the brink of expansion, I won’t forget where I came from.

Franz Falckenhaus, "Big Player," 2011, mixed media digital collage (image courtesy of Saatchi Online)

Franz Falckenhaus, "Big Player," 2011, mixed media digital collage (image courtesy of Saatchi Online)

(quotation from Elizabeth Cady Stanton)



Into the Wild Technicolor Yonder

Greetings, readers! It is hard to believe I haven’t written in almost three months, but things have been chaotic in the best, busiest way. I have successfully moved into a new apartment with my delightful significant other, and am expanding my writing into new outlets. I am contributing to a spectacular arts journalism blog founded by CUE Art Foundation called ON-VERGE. I have been chosen as the Contributor at Large for 2012-2013 and am ecstatic to be working with Jill Conner and Megan Garwood. I will be contributing regular features and show recommendations for the site, so check it out for my latest! I am going to dedicate more of my leftover material and exuding opinions to this space, allowing it to be a supplement to the material I present to ON-VERGE.

So thus, my first feature to share! Last week I interviewed Sarah Kurz, an absolutely lovely figurative painter with a show up at Allegra LaViola Gallery in Chinatown as we speak through March 11. Please check out the full interview here, let me know what you think! Here’s a small excerpt:

“The desire to reinvent the figure has become a point of contention, demanding more than the gestural theatrics of Parmigianino or blatant authority of Velazquez. Sarah Kurz rehashes the versatility of figurative painting by provoking a psychological intimacy with her audience and a physical solidarity with her medium. I spoke with her prior to her first solo exhibition at Allegra LaViola gallery in Chinatown about the work in the show, her guiding lights, and the comedy of sex.

LM Let’s talk about your upcoming show, “Made for Love”. Why is everything so small?

SK I am thinking about human size, interaction, and intimacy. I want the viewer to relate to the image. I am interested in cropping an existing image to only show what needs to be shown. You know, ‘less is more’. I edit inconsequential information and only keep what is absolutely necessary. It’s about conveying as much as possible through as little information as possible. Asking what really needs to be in this image to convey what I want to convey. It’s a reductive approach. I had a critique with Eugenie Tsai and she said the teapot painting [Never in the Morning, 2009] was like the cover of a romance novel. She said she could feel the whole novel through that image. The teapot painting is a new take on a still life, it captures a moment mid-action, it’s an active still life.”

Sarah Kurz, 'Tried and True,' 2012, oil on linen, 7" x 12"

Sarah Kurz, 'Tried and True,' 2012, oil on linen, 7" x 12"

Sarah Kurz, 'Mon Amour, Mon Ami (Le Bonheur),' 2012, oil on linen, 54" x 30"

Sarah Kurz, 'Mon Amour, Mon Ami (Le Bonheur),' 2012, oil on linen, 54" x 30"

Sarah Kurz, 'Lovely to See You,' 2012, oil on linen, 30" x 20"

Sarah Kurz, 'Lovely to See You,' 2012, oil on linen, 30" x 20"

((Coming up on ON-VERGE: An ode to ‘On Photography’ (Susan Sontag) via the current programming at ICP.))



HIGHESTLIGHTS
November 20, 2011, 8:23 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Um….well, this is awkward…hi.

I realize it has been quite some time since I’ve written, but I have an excuse! I swear! A relentless work sched (blahblahblah) combined with a sabbatical to the Iberian Peninsula for the month of October has had me out in the world rather than reflecting in physical form. Until now! I have returned with a lust for life and so much visual stimulation stocked in my neurons I could almost topple over. And now…THE  INTERNATIONAL WONDERS!

"Clothing the Naked," Maestro de la Vista Santa Gudule, ca. 1470, Oil on panel, 63.5 x 41.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Clothing the Naked," Maestro de la Vista Santa Gudule, ca. 1470, Oil on panel, 63.5 x 41.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Clothing the Naked," (DETAIL) Maestro de la Vista Santa Gudule, ca. 1470, Oil on panel, 63.5 x 41.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Clothing the Naked," (DETAIL) Maestro de la Vista Santa Gudule, ca. 1470, Oil on panel, 63.5 x 41.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Clothing the Naked," (DETAIL) Maestro de la Vista Santa Gudule, ca. 1470, Oil on panel, 63.5 x 41.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Clothing the Naked," (DETAIL) Maestro de la Vista Santa Gudule, ca. 1470, Oil on panel, 63.5 x 41.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Virgin and Child Enthroned," Rogier van der Weyden, ca. 1433, Oil on panel, 15.8 x 11.4 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Virgin and Child Enthroned," Rogier van der Weyden, ca. 1433, Oil on panel, 15.8 x 11.4 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Annunciation Diptych," Jan van Eyck, ca. 1433-1435, Oil on panel. Left wing (The Archangel Gabriel): 38.8 x 23.2 cm. Right wing (The Virgin Mary): 39 x 24 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Annunciation Diptych," Jan van Eyck, ca. 1433-1435, Oil on panel. Left wing (The Archangel Gabriel): 38.8 x 23.2 cm. Right wing (The Virgin Mary): 39 x 24 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Portrait of a Young Woman known as "La Bella"," Palma Vecchio, ca. 1518-20, Oil on canvas, 95 x 80 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Portrait of a Young Woman known as "La Bella"," Palma Vecchio, ca. 1518-20, Oil on canvas, 95 x 80 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Immaculate Conception," El Greco and Jorge Manuel Theotokópoulos, ca. 1608-14, Oil on canvas, 108 x 82 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Immaculate Conception," El Greco and Jorge Manuel Theotokópoulos, ca. 1608-14, Oil on canvas, 108 x 82 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Young Peasant with a Flask," Tommaso Salini, ca. 1610, Oil on canvas, 99 x 73 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Young Peasant with a Flask," Tommaso Salini, ca. 1610, Oil on canvas, 99 x 73 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Night: Mediterranean Coast Scene with Fishermen and Boats," Claude-Joseph Vernet, 1753, Oil on canvas, 96.5 x 134.6 cm (Carmen Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection on deposit at Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza)

"Night: Mediterranean Coast Scene with Fishermen and Boats," Claude-Joseph Vernet, 1753, Oil on canvas, 96.5 x 134.6 cm (Carmen Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection on deposit at Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza)

"Portrait of Max Schmidt," Oskar Kokoschka, 1914, Oil on canvas,  90 x 57.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Portrait of Max Schmidt," Oskar Kokoschka, 1914, Oil on canvas, 90 x 57.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Yellow Flowers," Henri Matisse, 1902, Oil on canvas, 46 x 54.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"The Yellow Flowers," Henri Matisse, 1902, Oil on canvas, 46 x 54.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Bottle, Carafe, Jug and Lemons," Paul Cézanne, 1902-6, Watercolour on paper, 44.5 x 60 cm, (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Bottle, Carafe, Jug and Lemons," Paul Cézanne, 1902-6, Watercolour on paper, 44.5 x 60 cm, (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Portrait of George Washington's Cook," Gilbert Stuart , ca. 1795-97, Oil on canvas, 76 x 63.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Portrait of George Washington's Cook," Gilbert Stuart , ca. 1795-97, Oil on canvas, 76 x 63.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Proun 5 A" El Lissitzky , 1919, 22 x 17.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Proun 5 A" El Lissitzky , 1919, 22 x 17.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Untitled (Geometrical Drawing)," Alexander Vesnin, ca. 1920-21, Ink on paper, 33.5 x 24.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Untitled (Geometrical Drawing)," Alexander Vesnin, ca. 1920-21, Ink on paper, 33.5 x 24.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Merzbild Kijkduin," Kurt Schwitters, 1923, Oil, pencil and wood assemblage on cardboard, 74.3 x 60.3 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Merzbild Kijkduin," Kurt Schwitters, 1923, Oil, pencil and wood assemblage on cardboard, 74.3 x 60.3 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Juan Gris Cockatoo No. 4," Joseph Cornell, ca. 1953-54, Construction, 50 x 30 x 11.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Juan Gris Cockatoo No. 4," Joseph Cornell, ca. 1953-54, Construction, 50 x 30 x 11.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Imaginary Numbers," Yves Tanguy ," 1954, Oil on canvas, 99 x 80 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Imaginary Numbers," Yves Tanguy ," 1954, Oil on canvas, 99 x 80 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Untitled," Clyfford Still, 1965, Oil on canvas, 254 x 176.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Untitled," Clyfford Still, 1965, Oil on canvas, 254 x 176.5 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Portrait of a Woman," Alberto Giacometti, 1965, Oil on canvas, 86 x 65 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Portrait of a Woman," Alberto Giacometti, 1965, Oil on canvas, 86 x 65 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Express," Robert Rauschenberg, 1963, Oil, silkscreen and collage on canvas, 184.2 x 305.2 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"Express," Robert Rauschenberg, 1963, Oil, silkscreen and collage on canvas, 184.2 x 305.2 cm (Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid)

"L´Acrobate à la Boule," Pablo Picasso, 1905, Oil on canvas, 147 x 95 cm. ©The State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow. © Pablo Picasso Estate. VEGAP. Madrid, 2011

"L´Acrobate à la Boule," Pablo Picasso, 1905, Oil on canvas, 147 x 95 cm. ©The State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow. © Pablo Picasso Estate. VEGAP. Madrid, 2011

"The Archduke Francis of Austria," Anton Rafael Mengs, 1700, oil on canvas. (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)

"The Archduke Francis of Austria," Anton Rafael Mengs, 1700, oil on canvas. (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)

"Christ Crucified," Diego Rodríguez de Silva Velazquez, ca. 1632, oil on linen, 248 cm x 169 cm (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)

"Christ Crucified," Diego Rodríguez de Silva Velazquez, ca. 1632, oil on linen, 248 cm x 169 cm (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)

"Saint Gregory," Juan de Nalda, ca. 1505, tempera and oil on panel, 76 x 60 cm (Museo Nacional del Prado)

"Saint Gregory," Juan de Nalda, ca. 1505, tempera and oil on panel, 76 x 60 cm (Museo Nacional del Prado)

"Before the Wedding," Antonio Munoz Degrain, 1884, oil on canvas (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)

"Before the Wedding," Antonio Munoz Degrain, 1884, oil on canvas (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)

Pilgrimage to the Well of San Isidro, Francisco Goya, 1821-1823, mixed techniques on reclaimed canvas (Museo Nacional del Prado)

Pilgrimage to the Well of San Isidro, Francisco Goya, 1821-1823, mixed techniques on reclaimed canvas (Museo Nacional del Prado)

"Sexto Mes," Rafa Macarron, 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo con urna de metacrilato, 162 x 130 x 4cm (Distrito 4, Madrid)

"Sexto Mes," Rafa Macarron, 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo con urna de metacrilato, 162 x 130 x 4cm (Distrito 4, Madrid)

Rafa Macarron, 'Que Fria,' 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo con urna de metacrilato, 146 x 114 x 4 cm. (Distrito 4, Madrid)

Rafa Macarron, 'Que Fria,' 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo con urna de metacrilato, 146 x 114 x 4 cm. (Distrito 4, Madrid)

"Operación Limpieza," Rafa Macarron, 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo con urna de metacrilato, 140 x 240 x 4 cm (Distrito 4, Madrid)

"Operación Limpieza," Rafa Macarron, 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo con urna de metacrilato, 140 x 240 x 4 cm (Distrito 4, Madrid)

"Quedada en el patio sur," Rafa Macarron, 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo y madera, 183 x 297 x 43 cm (Distrito 4, Madrid)

"Quedada en el patio sur," Rafa Macarron, 2011, Técnica mixta sobre lienzo y madera, 183 x 297 x 43 cm (Distrito 4, Madrid)

"Woman and Dog Beneath the Moon," Joan Miro, 1936, oil on canvas

"Woman and Dog Beneath the Moon," Joan Miro, 1936, oil on canvas

"Head of Crying Woman with Handkerchief (III)," Pablo Picasso, 1937 (Museo Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Head of Crying Woman with Handkerchief (III)," Pablo Picasso, 1937 (Museo Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Painting (Man with a Pipe)," Joan Miro, 1925 (Museo Nacional del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Painting (Man with a Pipe)," Joan Miro, 1925 (Museo Nacional del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Broken Plate," Andre Kertesz, 1929, gelatin silver print (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Broken Plate," Andre Kertesz, 1929, gelatin silver print (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"1951-D," Clyfford Still, 1951, oil on canvas (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"1951-D," Clyfford Still, 1951, oil on canvas (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Mascotas por la diagonal, Barcelona," Francesc Catala Roca, 1950, gelatin silver print (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Mascotas por la diagonal, Barcelona," Francesc Catala Roca, 1950, gelatin silver print (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Musician's Table," Juan Gris, 1926, oil on canvas (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Musician's Table," Juan Gris, 1926, oil on canvas (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

" Nudes on the Beach," Jose de Togares, 1922, oil on canvas (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

" Nudes on the Beach," Jose de Togares, 1922, oil on canvas (Nacional Museo del Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid)

"Liberation," M.C. Escher, 1956, lithograph (Museum of the Alhambra, Granada)

"Liberation," M.C. Escher, 1956, lithograph (Museum of the Alhambra, Granada)

"Covered Alley in Atrani," M.C Escher, 1931, xylograph (Museum of the Alhambra, Granada)

"Covered Alley in Atrani," M.C Escher, 1931, xylograph (Museum of the Alhambra, Granada)

"Sunflowers," M.C. Escher, 1918, linoleum cut (Museum of the Alhambra, Granada)

"Sunflowers," M.C. Escher, 1918, linoleum cut (Museum of the Alhambra, Granada)

"Head of a Woman," Pablo Picasso, 1946, oil on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Head of a Woman," Pablo Picasso, 1946, oil on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Bust of a Woman on Brown and White Ground," Pablo Picasso, 1928, oil and charcoal on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Bust of a Woman on Brown and White Ground," Pablo Picasso, 1928, oil and charcoal on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Male Watching his Sleeping Female Companion," Pablo Picasso, 1922, oil and pencil on panel (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Male Watching his Sleeping Female Companion," Pablo Picasso, 1922, oil and pencil on panel (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Head of a Man with Pink and Green ZigZags," Pablo Picasso, 1965, oil on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Head of a Man with Pink and Green ZigZags," Pablo Picasso, 1965, oil on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Woman with a Green Collar," Pablo Picasso, 1938, oil on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Woman with a Green Collar," Pablo Picasso, 1938, oil on canvas (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Female Acrobat," Pablo Picasso, 1930, oil on panel (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

"Female Acrobat," Pablo Picasso, 1930, oil on panel (Museo Picasso Malaga, Malaga)

 

Readers, be enticed: the blog will be back in full force after December 1st, the day of my reckoning that will optimally culminate in finding a roof over my head. Wish me luck!



How to Participate, Not Regurgitate

An extremely insightful article that I helped edit by Federica Bueti, an Italian curator based in Berlin, was put up today on Art&Education. I’ve worked with her a few times before digitally and thoroughly enjoy her inquiries into time-lapse work, process, and the politics of art. This newest article, entitled  “Give Me the Time (for an Aesthetic of Desistance),” investigates participation in art and its evolution from the 1960s to today: is participation still an act of resistance within the traditions of art? Has the socio-political environment completely neutralized participation and its aim to challenge participants and spectators? Has participation just become an institutionalized, almost predictable and thus stagnant, form of art practice? Here’s a small excerpt from the full article:

“But in order to establish a different meaning for participation, we should perhaps reconsider current cultural attitudes and social behaviors. Time, for example, needs to be re-introduced into current artistic, critical and curatorial production. Not as an oscillation of time, but as a “spatialization of the subject”. Against the backdrop of contemporary virtual and physical progress, one could oppose the necessity of durational experience and the sense of prolonged time that resists rapid consumptionExperience is comprised of time spent as well as a space of experience and shared intensities. Time is an essential element in participatory practices. Diverse knowledge and exchanges, and fruitful long-term relations require not just physical time but steadfast consistency. Endured duration is particularly vital in the context of virtual-communications. The reason is quite simple: people don’t share the same level of understanding or sensitivity, and a model of learning, exchanging and developing relationships varies extensively. Speed of pace is different for everyone. We cannot wish for the contrary without surrendering to the trap of authoritarian vision.

Adopting a creative model based on collaboration does not only mean maximizing outcomes or saving economic resources. People should revel in the space and allow for participation, discussion, and confrontating beliefs and modes of thinking. Only then can operative possibilities for transforming the acquired knowledge into operative models of actions unfold. A space of conflict where dissimilarities can play out and subsequently be used rather than liquidated at the first mention of a discrepancy is essential.

We should not forget that collaborations have become a necessity for the growth and implementation of profits in the capital industry. Today managerial agendas abide by more complex yet malleable democratic models. Groups can be identified through their representative members, for example, which spurs homogenization and the dissolution of the individuals ultimately relied upon for the decision. Participation, under the guise of performance, is constantly compromised. It accepts the conditions for the benefit of others, further perpetuating the current illusory, consensual democratic trend. Any partnership in this context becomes a tool for pursuing individual interests at the expense of potentially collective achievements.”

 

((Federica Bueti is also the founder of MENT , a journal that explores contemporary culture, art, and politics.))



Treatz

Jane Evelyn Atwood:

From 'The Blind' series

From 'The Blind' series

From 'The Blind' series

From 'The Blind' series

From 'The Blind' series

From 'The Blind' series

From 'The Blind' series

From 'The Blind' series

From 'Darfur' series

From 'Darfur' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Other' series

From 'Women Prisons' series

From 'Women in Prisons' series

From 'Landmines' series

From 'Landmines' series

Alex Maclean:

Alex MacLean, 'Parking Lot Markings, Taunton, Massachusetts'

Alex MacLean, 'Parking Lot Markings, Taunton, Massachusetts' From 'Going' series

Alex MacLean, 'Dinghies Clustered Around Dock, Duxbury, Massachusetts'

Alex MacLean, 'Dinghies Clustered Around Dock, Duxbury, Massachusetts' From 'Going' series

From 'Dwelling' series

From 'Dwelling' series

Alex MacLean, 'Four Converging Paved Cul-de-Sacs, Houston, Texas' From 'Dwelling' series

Alex MacLean, 'Four Converging Paved Cul-de-Sacs, Houston, Texas' From 'Dwelling' series

Alex MacLean, 'Housing Development at Different Stages, Henderson, Nevada' From 'Dwelling' series

Alex MacLean, 'Housing Development at Different Stages, Henderson, Nevada' From 'Dwelling' series

Alex MacLean, 'B-52 "Bone Yard" Tucson, Arizona' From 'Deserting' series

Alex MacLean, 'B-52 "Bone Yard" Tucson, Arizona' From 'Deserting' series

Alex MacLean, 'Junk Yard Along River, Southern New Hampshire,' From 'Deserting' series

Alex MacLean, 'Junk Yard Along River, Southern New Hampshire,' From 'Deserting' series

Alex MacLean, 'Blighted Housing Block Near Waterfront, Baltimore, Maryland,' From 'Deserting' series

Alex MacLean, 'Blighted Housing Block Near Waterfront, Baltimore, Maryland,' From 'Deserting' series

Alex MacLean, 'Algae Between Logs Longview, Washington' from 'Growing' series

Alex MacLean, 'Algae Between Logs Longview, Washington' from 'Growing' series

Alex MacLean, 'Flower Fields Carlsbad, California' from 'Growing' series

Alex MacLean, 'Flower Fields Carlsbad, California' from 'Growing' series

Alex MacLean,'Tobbaco Barn in Field with Long Shadows' from 'Growing' series

Alex MacLean,'Tobbaco Barn in Field with Long Shadows' from 'Growing' series

Edwin Bethea:

Edwin Bethea, 'Displaced Sudanese King,' 2008, 45" x 45". Watercolor and nails on paper. Auctioned at charity event for HOPE organization

Edwin Bethea, 'Displaced Sudanese King,' 2008, 45" x 45". Watercolor and nails on paper. Auctioned at charity event for HOPE organization

Edwin Bethea, 'Robert Frederick Erickson,' 2005. 3' x 3'. Oil on paper

Edwin Bethea, 'Robert Frederick Erickson,' 2005. 3' x 3'. Oil on paper

Edwin Bethea, 'Sunset on Destruction, Moonrise on a Rebellion,' 2009. 18" x 24". Oil on panel

Edwin Bethea, 'Sunset on Destruction, Moonrise on a Rebellion,' 2009. 18" x 24". Oil on panel

Edwin Bethea, 'Train Conductor,' 2007. 14 1/4"x 7 3/4". Etching

Edwin Bethea, 'Train Conductor,' 2007. 14 1/4"x 7 3/4". Etching

Edwin Bethea, 'Corpus Christie,' 2006. 22" x 30". Ink on paper

Edwin Bethea, 'Corpus Christie,' 2006. 22" x 30". Ink on paper

Edwin Bethea, 'Rubix Cube Contemplation,' 2007. 16 1/2" x 11". Watercolor on paper

Edwin Bethea, 'Rubix Cube Contemplation,' 2007. 16 1/2" x 11". Watercolor on paper

Mark Beerens:

Mark Beerens, from 'Metamorphoses' series

Mark Beerens, 'Metamorphose 1.22,' 2010, 189 x 133.5 cm, from 'Metamorphoses' series

Mark Beerens, from 'Metamorphoses' series

Mark Beerens, 'Still life with Flowers,' 2010, 133.5 x 189 cm, from 'Metamorphoses' series

Mark Beerens, from 'Metamorphoses' series

Mark Beerens, 'Social Security,' 2010, 133.5 x 189 cm, from 'Metamorphoses' series

Mark Beerens, 'Dazzle Devil,'

Mark Beerens, 'Dazzle Devil,' 2010, 380 x 144 cm, from 'Serie 10.1'



Christmas List 6

Graphic Diagrams: The Graphic Visualization of Abstract Data by Walter Herdeg: I absolutely adore the fusion of art and seemingly practical knowledge, which is precisely the case with Herdeg’s intuitive parallel of information with graphic design. There are two editions of this book, one from 1974 and a second from 1976 that apparently isn’t as challenging, that integrate a variety of designers and artists to visualize quantity, statistics, and flux.

All photos courtesy of Designer Books

From the Masters of Cinema Series: David Lynch, by Thierry Jousse: Because everyone should know a little more about David Lynch and his breathtaking use of atmosphere, illogical narrative interjections, and ability to observe and highlight the peripheral details. ‘Blue Velvet’ and ‘Mulholland Drive’ are cinematic gold.

A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes, by Stephen Hawking: Who doesn’t love outer space and the eternal mystery that is time?! I, for one, am mildly obsessed with the contemplation of time and am sold on acquiring Hawking’s insight into cosmology. It was a New York Times Best Seller and sold millions of copies, plus Hawking apparently was inducted into the Royal Society, an organization pushing for scientific innovation which had Issac Newton himself as president in the 18th century. The book was noted for including minimal mathematical formulas yet explaining phenomena like black holes and quarks with stunning simplicity. Also, diagrams and drawings are a major accompaniment to the text, which always helps us visual-memory aesthetes. Hawkings is so inspiring that Errol Morris generated a documentary on the genius’ life in 1991, also named A Brief History of Time.



Cinematic Photography or Photographic Film?

Despite being somewhat stagnant on the freelance writing front for the last month (I blame moving out of my Brooklyn apartment, a lack of inspiration, and a general desire to be anywhere but New York in the dog-days), I have a recent piece that went up on Whitehot Magazine that I am incredibly proud of. I was introduced to Vanessa Albury, a daring new media artist working in the mediums of 16/35mm film and photography of all breeds, at Peter Clough’s One and Three Quarters of an Inch show at St. Cecilia’s last year (it was brilliant!). Her piece was an exotic thrill, an incredibly overwhelming display of tropical foliage that wrapped up the central, spiral staircase in the convent. Poignant scents ascended the stairwell and several lights illuminated the lush vegetation for dramatic emphasis. The piece was inspired by her grandfather’s Miami greenhouse and maintains Albury’s emphasis on triggering collective and public memory, milking and challenging time, and astutely hypnotizing the viewer. The profile recently published analyzes her oeuvre of photographic and cinematic work spanning approximately ten years and links it to new, even unfinished, works.

Below is a small passage, but check out the full review here.

Photography has been regarded as an indicator of passing time and death since the turn of the 20th century. Theoretically, the snapshot was an inexplicable moment: impossible to recreate and a betrayal to the truth of the moment in its lack of breath, of movement. ‘Funeral (Projection)’ (2005-08) cleverly mocks photography’s mythological magnitude. The piece was realized at Albury’s grandmother’s funeral in 2004. The wide-angle, 35mm shot of a cleared out funeral hall situates the deceased, resting in her coffin, at the center of the image. A chandelier and several table lamps within the frame beam triumphantly, almost on the verge of bursting from augmented amplification at the time of death. A subterranean perspective bellies vulnerability. The photograph is presented as an installation: it occupies an entire wall as the hum of a projector contributes a drone to the collective viewing experience. The viewer slips into reverie amid the murmur of machinery and the weight of the relentless moment. Albury asserts this photograph as an uninterrupted, persistent memorial. It is an emotional scene identifiable to the subconscious of the viewer. Albury provides ‘Funeral (Memory)’ (2005-08) as a keepsake reflecting upon the installation. The highly pixelated Xerox copy of the projection challenges the subject’s timelessness in memory. The Xerox is a synopsis, degrading the poignant image into a muddled scene of black and white diamonds. Photography parallels memory in this case, reflecting the instability of emotional documentation and the nuances of time. Repetition, as was the case in learning cursive or multiplication tables, can solidify memory while numbing one to the particulars of the present. “

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Memory),' 2005-08, Xerox copy

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Memory),' 2005-08, Xerox copy

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Projection),' 2005-2008, 35mm projection

Vanessa Albury, 'Funeral (Projection),' 2005-2008, 35mm projection




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